Public safety officials receive peer support training

  • Lt. Misty Houston, Rabun County Emergency Medical Services, and Deputy Andy Beck help sort out people’s problems by walking through an example narrative of a peer in a crisis situation during a scenario-based workshop at Peer Support training held at Tabernacle Baptist Church last Monday. Trampes Stancil, Captain for Rabun County Emergency Medical Services, left, and Chanon Pritchard, Rabun County Sheriff’s Office Deputy, share a laugh during a scenario-based exercise at Peer Support training.
    Lt. Misty Houston, Rabun County Emergency Medical Services, and Deputy Andy Beck help sort out people’s problems by walking through an example narrative of a peer in a crisis situation during a scenario-based workshop at Peer Support training held at Tabernacle Baptist Church last Monday. Trampes Stancil, Captain for Rabun County Emergency Medical Services, left, and Chanon Pritchard, Rabun County Sheriff’s Office Deputy, share a laugh during a scenario-based exercise at Peer Support training.
Body

LAKEMONT— Rabun County public safety officials dedicate their time to helping residents in the community with their problems and concerns, but last week they got the opportunity to support each other and address questions and challenges they might be facing in their own professional and personal lives.

Representatives from Rabun County Fire Services, the Sheriff’s Office and Emergency Medical Services completed a two-day Peer Support Program focusing on how to recognize and engage a peer that might be experiencing a personal crisis.

Tabernacle Baptist Church hosted the training with instructors Dorie Jones and Joey Fennell, co-founders of Crisis Support Solutions.

This company helps “agencies start, train and maintain efficient and effective support programs,” according their website.

Jones holds a Master of Social Work (MSW) and Fennell is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC).

“I’ve noticed a larger need for this in public safety,” said Sheriff Chad Nichols to the class about why this program is important.

He said that it is something that needs to be addressed that isn’t focused on currently.

To read the full story, click here. 

Click here to subscribe and view the E-Edition of The Clayton Tribune

Headlines in The Clayton Tribune