Post Office needs packages picked up

  • Megan Broome/The Clayton Tribune. Colby Nichols organizes packages for shipment at the Clayton Post Office on Monday. The Post Office saw a 14 percent increase in packages compared to the same time last year.
    Megan Broome/The Clayton Tribune. Colby Nichols organizes packages for shipment at the Clayton Post Office on Monday. The Post Office saw a 14 percent increase in packages compared to the same time last year.
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 ‘Tis the season for giving and that means that the post office is receiving a larger quantity of packages compared to other times of the year.

“If you own a P.O. Box, it would be really appreciated for you to come pick up your packages,” said Postmaster Sherri Gabrels, in an interview Monday.

Gabrels said that due to the post office’s constrained space, it would be helpful for patrons to pick up their packages on time so post office workers can continue receiving and sorting through inventory.

She said that the holiday season is the busiest time of year for the post office.

“We’re up 14 percent overall on all of our packages,” Gabrels said when comparing it to last year’s numbers.

 She said that Rural Carrier Associates (RCA) deliver packages to houses around the county and that because they are short staffed, it would be helpful if residents take certain measures to ensure that the RCA’s can easily find the intended location of the package delivery.

“Make sure that your 911 mailing address is where the carrier can visibly see it,” Gabrels said.

She said that the number should be visible on the house, not just on the mailbox.

Gabrels said that they have had situations where a 911 number is listed only on the mailbox, but it is in a row with other mailboxes so it was difficult to determine which house the package should be delivered to.

 She said that sometimes the carrier would have to take the package back to the post office because they could not distinguish which residence it needed to be delivered to.

Gabrels said that residents might expect to get their mail a little later than usual due to being short-handed.

“We’ll be out running late,” Gabrels said. She said that if a resident hasn’t gotten their mail by 4 or 5 p.m., it would be helpful for them to leave a light on so the postal worker can see when delivering their mail later, such as around 6 or 7 p.m.

As far as going to the post office to mail packages out, Gabrels said that if a resident has a pre-paid package, one that is already stamped and ready to be shipped, they can drop it off without having to wait in line.

She said if you do need to wait in line to get it stamped, it is helpful to already have it taped up and addressed when arriving at the counter to help speed the process along.

Gabrels said that the post office has shipping supplies that patrons can come get any time of the day, most of which are free of charge.

For all the last-minute shoppers out there, the 2019 holiday shipping cut off dates are fast approaching.

The cut off dates in order to receive packages by Christmas are:

First Class Mail, about 4-5 days-December 20

Priority Mail, about 2-3 days- December 21

Priority Mail Express, guaranteed in 1-2 days-December 23